26 Apr 11 at 7 pm

Iascairi

Krzysztof Maniocha

Iascairi means fishermen in Irish. These men are tough, hard working and quite often rest only a few hours during each 24-hour work marathon. Today’s law in Ireland for catching fish is quite different from many years ago. For various reasons (European Union laws) Ireland has given some rights to catch fish to other countries such as Spain or Holland. Today on Irish coasts a trawler is allowed to catch only a certain quota of fish, however there are rumours of trawlers catching fish and transporting their cargo to smaller boats.

Within the story of iascairi many different arise such as the exploitation of foreign workers or the ecology of the Irish coast, to me this environment of fishermen firstly remains full of personal stories.  

Victor is a man from Lithuania. Since moving to Ireland he has been working as a fisherman. When I first met him he was already working on a boat doing one of the toughest and most difficult jobs in the fishing industry: catching crabs. He told me a story about a dream he had when he was previously working on a different boat. In this dream two of his dead nieces appeared, and when he awoke he knew he would have to leave the boat. He did not have any logical explanation or other reason for leaving his place of work except that dream, but even so, he decided to leave. Approximately a month after he left, the boat sank..  

www.maniocha.com

Iascairi
Krzysztof Maniocha
Iascairi means fishermen in Irish. These men are tough, hard working and quite often rest only a few hours during each 24-hour work marathon. Today’s law in Ireland for catching fish is quite different from many years ago. For various reasons (European Union laws) Ireland has given some rights to catch fish to other countries such as Spain or Holland. Today on Irish coasts a trawler is allowed to catch only a certain quota of fish, however there are rumours of trawlers catching fish and transporting their cargo to smaller boats.
Within the story of iascairi many different arise such as the exploitation of foreign workers or the ecology of the Irish coast, to me this environment of fishermen firstly remains full of personal stories.  
Victor is a man from Lithuania. Since moving to Ireland he has been working as a fisherman. When I first met him he was already working on a boat doing one of the toughest and most difficult jobs in the fishing industry: catching crabs. He told me a story about a dream he had when he was previously working on a different boat. In this dream two of his dead nieces appeared, and when he awoke he knew he would have to leave the boat. He did not have any logical explanation or other reason for leaving his place of work except that dream, but even so, he decided to leave. Approximately a month after he left, the boat sank..  
www.maniocha.com